Your question: Why is it important to protect the brain and spinal cord?

It controls hunger and thirst and some of the most basic body functions, such as body temperature, blood pressure, and breathing. The brain is protected by the bones of the skull and by a covering of three thin membranes called meninges. The brain is also cushioned and protected by cerebrospinal fluid.

What 3 things protect the brain and spinal cord?

The brain and spinal cord are covered by three layers of meninges, or protective coverings: the dura mater, the arachnoid mater, and the pia mater.

Why is it important to protect the brain?

Brain health is about keeping your mind active, feeding it plenty of nutrients and oxygen, and reducing risk factors that can harm the brain. Chronic conditions that affect our overall physical health – like diabetes, heart disease or high blood pressure, can affect our brain health.

What are two main things that protect the brain from physical damage?

The brain is protected by the bones of the skull and by a covering of three thin membranes called meninges. The brain is also cushioned and protected by cerebrospinal fluid.

Can your spine affect your brain?

Spinal cord injuries can cause widespread and sustained brain inflammation that leads to progressive loss of nerve cells, with associated cognitive problems and depression, researchers have found for the first time.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Do Guard dogs protect homes from burglars?

Why is the spinal cord so important?

The spinal cord and the brain together constitute the Central Nervous System. It is an incredibly complex and intricate mesh of nerves. Functioning as the body’s main relay station, the CNS is responsible for all the basic functions of the body, such as breathing, walking, talking, movement, and reflexes.

Is spinal cord part of the brain?

The spinal cord is an extension of the central nervous system (CNS), which consists of the brain and spinal cord. The spinal cord begins at the bottom of the brain stem (at the area called the medulla oblongata) and ends in the lower back, as it tapers to form a cone called the conus medullaris.